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Welcome to the Early Intervention Page

Ottawa County

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Click here to learn more about Early Intervention services!

What is Ohio Early Intervention? Click here to find out!

The first three years of life are the most critical in a child’s development. There are typical signs of growth and development, and each child learns and grows differently. Parents are often the first to notice when their child is not learning or growing like other infants and toddlers. Sometimes, as they grow, children may have trouble seeing, hearing, talking, walking—or have other special needs. That’s when Early Intervention (EI) &Early Intervention  can help.

Early Intervention has four goals:

  • to enhance the development of infants & toddlers with disabilities;
  • reduce educational costs by minimizing the need for special education;
  • minimize the likelihood of institutionalization and maximize independent living;
  • and, to enhance the capacity of families to meet their child’s developmental needs.

We offer parents information about child development, activities to enhance development and referrals to community resources which provide services to children under the age of 3 and their families.

If your child is determined eligible, services may include:

  • Developmental screenings, assessments and evaluations
  • Home visiting
  • Service coordination
  • Link you to specialized services your child may need (i.e. Physical, Occupational & Speech therapies)
  • Assistance with transition to preschool
  • Family Support
  • Development of an IFSP (Individualized Family Service Plan

How do I make a referral to the Early Intervention Program?
If you have concerns about your infant or toddler’s development, contact Ottawa County Early Intervention at 567-262-3141 to make a referral.  


Developmental Milestones

Although each child's development is different, some common steps in your child's growth are listed below:

By 3 months
Lifts head and chest when lying on stomach
Makes cooing noises
Turns head to sounds
Begins to make eye contact


By 6 Months
Sits with minimal support
Rolls from side to side
Babbles more than two sounds
Transfers objects from hand to hand and mouth to hand

By 12 months
Pulls self to standing
Crawls on hands and knees
Picks things up with thumb and one finger
Holds and drinks from a cup

By 18 months
Walks – may run a bit
Climbs up or down one step
Partially feeds self
May say 5-10 words

By 24 months
Walks-may run a bit
Walks up and down steps, two feet on
each step
Uses two word sentences
Imitates Housework

By 30 Months
Jumps with both feet in place
Follows 2 part command
Uses a 50 word vocabulary
Imitates drawing simple lines

By 36 months
Walks up stairs
Stands on one foot
Feeds self
Opens door
Ready for toilet training


Parents Rights in Early Intervention

Program participants have the following rights from the time of program referral throughout participation.

  • To be informed of rights both in writing and verbally in the program participant’s native language, unless clearly not feasible to do so.
  • To be fully informed of all information relevant to the activity for which consent is sought and to provide written consent before:
    1. Any tool to conduct screening, evaluation, or assessment is administered on or with the program participant;
    2. Any family-directed assessment is conducted with any member of the program participants family;
    3. Any service begins;
    4. Any record for the program participant is provided to an individual;
    5. Any information about the program participant is shared, who it will be shared with, and the time frame for which information may be shared, except when the information shared is required by procedures.
    6. The program participant’s personally identifying information is collected, except when the information collected is required by procedures.
    7. The program participant’s public benefits or private insurance is accessed to pay for services; and
    8. An application to access the early intervention system of payment is completed and submitted on behalf of the program participant.
  • To participate or decline to participate at any time and to be informed of how refusal to consent will affect the ability to receive services in the program.
  • To revoke previously provided consent at any time.
  • To accept or decline some or all   services through program participation, even after initially accepting it, without jeopardizing other services, with the following exceptions:
    1. A child will not be eligible for early intervention services and will be exited from the program if the parent refuses to consent to any of the screenings, evaluations or assessments, when required, in accordance with rule 3701-8-07 of the Administrative Code;
    2. A child will not be eligible for early intervention services and will be exited from the program if the parent refuses to consent to the development or review of an IFSP in accordance with rule 3701-8-07.1 of the Administrative Code.  However, a parent does have the right to decline a specific service suggested for an IFSP.
  • To request, be present at, and contribute fully as a team member in any and all meetings about their family, including IFSP meetings, and transition planning conferences.
  • To opt out of personally identifiable information being provided to the local education agency of residence.
  • To request a review or receive a copy of the program participant’s record at any time during program participation and until six years past the date of receipt of payment and to either review the record or receive a copy of the record within 10 calendar days.
  • To receive one electronic or paper copy of each completed IFSP, as applicable, at no cost within 10 calendar days of the event.
  • To be fully informed of requests, purpose, and time period for personally identifiable information; and to provide consent, before personally identifiable information would be shared, unless such disclosure is authorized under state and federal law and except when the information shared is required by procedures within.
  • To file a complaint with the department about services.

To make a complaint:

 

When a program participant who is a parent in early intervention files a complaint for an investigation or mediation, the complaint must include the following to be considered sufficient:
  1. A statement that the department, public agency or early intervention services provider has violated a requirement of IDEA early intervention or requirements of this chapter;
  2. Complaint must be in writing, contain contact information for program participant filing the complaint and be signed by program participant;
  3. The facts on which the statement is based;
  4. The name of the child and the name of the early intervention provider serving the child;
  5. A description of the nature of the problem of the child, including facts related to the problem;
  6. The complaint must allege a violation of the that occurred not more than one year prior to the date the complaint was received;
  7. A proposed resolution of the problem to the extent known and available at the time the complaint is filed; and
  8. A copy of the complaint must be provided to the public agency or early intervention services provider serving the child at the same time the complaint is filed with the department.

When the program participant who is a parent in early intervention files a complaint for a due process hearing, the complaint must include the following to be considered sufficient:

  1. The name and address of residence of the child;
  2. Complaint must be in writing and be signed by program participant or attorney for the program participant;
  3. The facts on which the statement is based;
  4. The name of the early intervention provider serving the child;
  5. A description of the nature of the problem of the child, relating to the proposed or refused initiation or change, including facts relating to the problem
  6. The complaint must allege a violation of the that occurred not more than 2 years prior to the date the complaint was received, and
  7. A proposed resolution of the problem to the extent known and available at the time the complaint is filed.

Complaints may be made by contacting the Ohio Department of Health Bureau of Early Intervention Services at:

Ohio Department of Health Bureau of Early Intervention Services
ATTN: Early Intervention Program
246 North High St, 5th Floor
Columbus, OH 43216-0118
EMAIL: BEIS@ODH.OHIO.GOV


Early Intervention
Baby Bill of Rights


TALK TO ME,
Sing, hum, babble, or even read the funnies to me! I don’t know what you're saying, but I need to hear you.   And I do know what you mean, even if I may not know the words.  Like your voice tones mean, “I love you”, or when you yell, I hear, “You're a pest!” Unless you communicate with me, how can I learn?  I learn from you.

HOLD ME,
Everything is so big and new to me. I don't understand where I am.  Or who I am. And I get scared, but when you hold me, your heartbeat makes me feel I belong here. I belong to you.

ANSWER MY CRY,
I don't cry to get you upset or get you mad. I cry because I can't tell you how I feel any other way. Maybe I'm cold...or wet...or hungry...or scared...or lonely. Answer my cries, you'll soon know what each one means.

YOU WON'T SPOIL ME!!!
You'll help me be a better baby and make you happier, too.

LOVE ME,
Like me.  Love me just as I am. Don't expect me to do what I can't do. Like being toilet-trained. My muscles aren't ready yet. I know I'm messy. But I'm growing. Overlook my baby weakness. You're the most important person in my world. I can't make it without you. So get to know me. Have fun with me, and love me...just as I am.


Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities
Bill of Rights

  • Be treated nicely at all times and as a person
  • Have a clean safe place to live in and, a place to be alone
  • Have food that is good for you
  • Be able to go, if you want, to any church, temple, mosque
  • Be able to go to a doctor or dentist when you are sick
  • Be able to have people help you with the way you walk, talk, do things with your hands, act or feel, if you need it
  • Be able to have people help and teach you, if you want
  • Be able to have time and a place to go to be by yourself
  • Be able to call, write letters or talk to anyone you want about anything you want
  • Be able to have your own things and be able to use them
  • Be able to have men and women as friends
  • Be able to join in activities and do things that will help you grow to be the best person you can be
  • Be able to work and make money
  • Be treated like everyone else
  • Not be hit, yelled at, cursed at, or called names that hurt you
  • Be able to learn new things, make friends, have activities to do, and go out in your community
  • Be able to tell people what you want and be part of making plans or decisions about your life
  • Be able to ask someone you want to help you, let others know how you feel or what you want
  • Be able to use your money to pay for things you need and want with help, if you need it
  • Be able to say yes or no before people talk about what you do at work or home or look at your file
  • Be able to complain or ask for changes if you don't like something without being afraid of getting in trouble
  • Not being given medicine that you don't need or held down if you are not hurting yourself or others
  • To vote and learn about laws and your community
  • To say yes or no to being part of a study or experiment

Ottawa County Family and Children First Council

Ottawa County Family & Children First Council meetings are open to the public and begin at 9:00 a.m. Meetings are held at:

Ottawa County Board of Developmental Disabilities Office
235 N Toussaint South Road
Oak Harbor, OH 43449

2016 Meeting Schedule:
January 8, 2016
March 4, 2016
May 6, 2016
July 8, 2016
September 2, 2016
November 4, 2016

For more information contact Margaret Osborne, Council Coordinator, at 567-262-3142 or goto here


 Ottawa County Family and Children First Council or OCFCFC promotes coordination and collaboration among local governmental social service agencies, non-profit organizations, businesses and families for the benefit of Ottawa County’s families and children. They review and sort existing programs, retool existing programs so they lead to better results for families and reinforce each other; identify and fill service gaps; develop a local service coordination plan, and maintain the accountability system which demonstrates progress on achieving Ohio Family and Children First goals. In other words, the council helps families work with a number of agencies to reach solutions that help children reach their full potential.


Early Childhood Coordinating Committee

The Early Childhood Coordinating Committee or ECCC is a committee of the OCFCFC.  The ECCC assists the FCFC in the design, coordination and implementation of the comprehensive, coordinated, interdisciplinary, family-centered Early Intervention system of services for families with an infant or toddler at risk for or with developmental delays.  The ECCC committee of the FCFC may choose to address broader early childhood issues.  Composition of the ECCC shall include representatives of local agencies and services that meet the needs of all infants and toddlers including children who are minority, low-income, homeless, in foster care or live in inner city and/or rural communities. 
If you have or had a child in Early Intervention and are interested in serving on either of the above contact the Family & Children First Council Coordinator at:


Ottawa County Family & Children First Council
Attn: FCFC Coordinator
235 N. Toussaint Sount Road
Oak Harbor, OH 43449
419-898-0400 ext. 3142


   


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